Beach Towels, Wraps, and Weavings

The holidays bring to mind a picturesque scene where roaring fires warm the slipper covered toes of couples snuggled under blankets, sipping cups of hot chocolate as they watch a gentle snowfall cover the wooded landscape outside. Candles and strands of twinkling lights draped across mantles and windowsills cast an amber glow and crackling logs serve as the ambient soundtrack to lull us to a state of blissful winter serenity. Even on the balmy 80 degree December days here in Miami, we find ourselves searching for that festive embrace of a cozy blanket to surround us with holiday spirit. So today we're sharing our favorite treasured textiles, from coveted wool blankets for those of you spending your holidays in colder climates to exceptional serapes and towels for those of us sunning the winter away in more tropical environments. Weave your loved ones into the storied history of the holidays, filled with threads of love, family, and thankfulness, by gifting one of these treasured textiles.



 


Let's start in the tropics by exploring a collection of towels, wraps, and sarongs that will have your loved ones forgetting about the lack of season-defining snowfall. On the stunning Hawaiian island of Oʻahu, Native Hawaiian Owner and Designer Tanya Uyehara of Laha'ole Designs, shares a trio of Pīkake towels that will surround you in plush microfiber and an elegant lei pattern featuring a winding garland of strung Arabian jasmine flowers. Pīkake, the Hawaiian name for these fragrant blossoms, is actually the word for 'peacock' but came to refer to the blooms as they were the favorite flower of 19th Princess Ka'iulani, known as the Peacock Princess. The petals are defined against the aubergine, pewter, and blushed pink backgrounds by soft golden outlines, with some strands of flowers remaining unfilled to offer a whispered floral frame while the petals of other strands are painted vibrant white for a luminous trail of floral jewels. The towels are irresistibly soft and unquestionably modern so you can be confident everyone on your list will eagerly surround themselves with these sea-side leis.



 

Earlier this year we watched in awe as over eleven thousand athletes, representing 33 sports and 206 nations, competed in the Olympic games offering us an opportunity to unify as nations and express our shared pride of homeland and to appreciate the innate human commonality and community that touches the furthest reaches of the Earth. After the pandemic narrowed our personal worlds, confining us to smaller and smaller local communities, the Olympics arrived as a refreshing and welcomed reminder of our global interconnectedness. This emergence from the darkness of isolation to the soul illuminating light of sodality is brilliantly epitomized by Betsy Bickle's The Other Olympics Beach Towel.


Bickle weaves a narrative of un-actualized possibilities and victorious unions by deconstructing the logos of potential host cities who ultimately lost the bid to hold the ceremonies and arranging them into a contemporary abstracted design. These cities with their abandoned plans were left in a position that bares a striking resemblance to the one that we all found ourselves in during the peak of the pandemic: all visions of the future that we had passionately designed were abruptly interrupted and we were left alone in our cities, unable to share our space with others. And these scars of abandoned plans and lost visions remain as the beautiful lines of proposed Olympic logos. Despite this loss, these host cities joined all of us in rallying around our athletically inclined kinfolk as they ventured outside our shrunken worlds and opened us back up to the global community we had missed. Can you think of a more romantic message to gift to your loved ones this holiday? We cannot!


Baron de Coubertin...the father of the modern Olympic Games..famously said The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not winning but taking part (1)